What Roots Us

 

 

Linguistic

We are indebted to the fields of literacy education that root our understandings of literacy practices. Also, to scholarship in sociolinguistics and raciolinguistics that roots our understandings of languages, language varieties, and language ideologies.

Justice

We are indebted to critical scholars that root our understandings of the social, cultural, historical, and political dimensions that create, disrupt, or sustain power within society and shape our commitments towards just action.

Collaborative

We are indebted to the cultural communities that have created our current geographic space and whose histories have shaped and reshaped our understandings of language, literacy, and justice. We are rooted in continuing to remember and sustain these communities through participatory and collaborative work.

 

 

Coming Soon: a collaboratively written theoretical and conceptual framework and theory of change. While you wait, check out these essential readings informing our thinking and work:

Baker-Bell, A. (2020). Linguistic justice: Black language, literacy, identity, and pedagogy. Routledge.

Caraballo, L., Lozenski, B. D., Lyiscott, J. J., & Morrell, E. (2017). YPAR and critical epistemologies: Rethinking education research. Review of Research in Education, 41(1), 311-336.

Flores, N., & Rosa, J. (2015). Undoing appropriateness: Raciolinguistic ideologies and language diversity in education. Harvard Educational Review, 85(2), 149

Hudley, A. H. C., Mallinson, C., & Bucholtz, M. (2020). Toward racial justice in linguistics: Interdisciplinary insights into theorizing race in the discipline and diversifying the profession. Language, 96(4), e200-e235.

Paris, D., & Alim, H. S. (Eds.). (2017). Culturally sustaining pedagogies: Teaching and learning for justice in a changing world. Teachers College Press.

Sánchez, L., & Honeyford, M. (2021). Creating critically engaged classrooms through community literacies. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 9-15.

Tuck, E. (2009). Suspending damage: A letter to communities. Harvard Educational Review, 79(3), 409-428.